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Modern Paved Roads (15mm)

I am working up simple terrain pieces for a Halloween zombie game, a setting in which I will likely only play in occasionally and so don't want to invest money, space, and time at the same level as my 28mm fantasy-themed skirmish gaming. I've opted to quickly paint some plastic railroad modeling buildings (will share those in a later post) and needed some basic terrain like streets, etc. With some free texture art I found online, I put together these road sections that I can use as surface streets in the play area.

I quickly cobbled these together because I couldn't find something similar for free online, and so I thought I would share the PDF in case anybody else in interested. I've simply pasted these using a glue stick to thin crafting foam sheets/paper to the sticky side of cheap linoleum tiles that I then cut to shape. The below images (low-res) are what you'll find in the PDF.


If you want to build your own scaled up to 28mm, I've pulled together a ZIP file with the "building-block" images I used to put these together.


 

 


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  1. Nice. Now you can start playing some Car Wars games as well! ;p

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